Heritage layout

I thought I would share a simple layout I completed using only Stampin’ Up Products- but no stamping.  I did use some ink-but only inked around the edges of the cardstock and patterned paper using a sponge.  

The cardstock is Old Olive and the patterned paper is from the Secret Garden Simply Scrappin’ Kit.  The paper is 12x 12 but I wanted to mount it on the cardstock without losing too much of the flourishes around the edges.  I trimmed it a little and then ended up slicing the sheet towards the middle of the paper which allowed me to fit the paper into my printer for the journalling- and when I put the page together- I simply covered the join with some ribbon and cardstock stickers.  I used the Stampin Up! Spiral Punch to create the look of the section of journalling coming from a notebook.

 

Journalling reads:

This is my Maternal Grandmother’s family, however, at the time the picture was taken my Grandmother was yet to be born.  This photo was taken after the family travelled through the night from Hope Valley to Fremantle. Emily had been sick and it was expected that she wouldn’t live for much longer.  They left at 1am with John and Emma up front of the sulky and the girls and small children stretched out on a mattress at the rear.  The boys rode horses.  They faced the photographers at 10am.  It is interesting to note that after this journey, Emily survived this illness and lived beyond 100 years of age.

My Grandmother’s parents- my Great Grandparents- John and Emma Mortimer (nee Postans) were married in 1880 and had nineteen children- two of whom died in infancy.  The couple settled in the Rockingham area and in about 1884, John Mortimer purchased forty acres of land on the southern end of Long Swamp in Hope Valley.  He built his own home in Hope Valley and donated 3 acres of land on which the old Hope Vallety School (now demolished) was built.  The family earned a reputation for being industrious and legendary tales were recounted about John Mortimer’s strength.  It is believed that on one occasion in Fremantle he collected a wager by lumping several coils of wire over a prescribed distance. It was generally accepted that it would have weighed more than 305kg by today’s measurements.

When I look at this photo 103 years after it was taken, I can’t help but feel overwhelmed by the number of children pictured.  I feel like I am busy with four children and couldn’t imagine having nineteen.  When Jared was shown this picture he pointed out my Great Aunt Fanny (standing second from the left) and asked me when this photo was taken and why I was pictured wearing these clothes.  He wasn’t the first to notice the resemblence but it is amazing how a 6 year old child can see a family resemblence in a photo taken over 100 years ago. 

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